Tag Archives: social distancing

How superspreading is fueling the pandemic – Vox

>6 Minute Podcast: What We Should Learn From The White House Coronavirus Cluster : NPR

“Any one of us could unknowingly be a superspreader.”

View full story at Source: >How superspreading is fueling the pandemic – Vox

“We now know that, on average, most people with the novel coronavirus pass the virus to just one other person, or to no one else at all. But some go on to infect many, many more, often before they even experience symptoms. Many of these transmission chains begin with “superspreading” events, where one person (usually in a crowded indoor space) passes the virus to dozens of others. Early contact tracing studies suggest these events have been a large driver of transmission around the world. By some estimates, 10 percent of people have been causing 80 percent of new infections. This is one of the reasons experts worry about large indoor gatherings— more so than outdoor ones — causing large spikes in case numbers.

Why is the coronavirus so good at superspreading? Find out at source link above.

“Some individuals seem to develop higher amounts of the virus in their system, upping their odds of transmitting it to others. And given that the amount of virus in the body tends to shift over the duration of infection — rising until around the onset of symptoms, then declining — the chance that someone is a likely superspreader changes over time.

“But what we have been learning is how individuals’ behavior could increase the chance they spread the virus to many others — or not. “We do know that wearing masks, keeping up physical distancing, avoiding crowds, and isolating upon becoming sick or testing positive can prevent superspreading,”

Figure A shows a large superspreading event that spiraled out from a cluster of bars in Hong Kong. Epidemiology

“These findings line up with other preliminary research that calculated closed environments to be almost 20 times more likely to spur additional coronavirus infections than open-air ones. There was concern that the massive protests across the US, which started in late May after the killing of George Floyd, would become superspreading events. So far the data suggests that wasn’t the case, with no large surge in cases in cities that had the largest demonstrations.

“This lines up with the science. “Outdoor events like the protests are inherently less risky than indoor events, given greater airflow (outside),” “It is also easier to spread out and maintain physical distancing.” And photographs of the protests have shown that a large number of people have been wearing masks. Still, no massive gathering is guaranteed to stay Covid-19-free. “There will still be increased risk of transmission given the large number of people present,” she says. It also appears that not all indoor venues and events are equally risky when it comes to starting a large cluster of new cases.

“A first step is following the lead of infectious disease experts, who know well what potential superspreading situations to avoid. “I might dine outside, if the tables were spaced apart, and I felt like the customers and restaurant staff were taking precautions.” Earlier this summer, she went camping with her family, but she chose campgrounds following CDC guidelines. “For other places, like parks and beaches, my advice is to be prepared to leave if they get crowded and you cannot safely distance,” she says.

Altruism Quotes

VIDEO: How To Protect Yourself From Coronavirus That Can Linger In The Air : Goats and Soda : NPR

Scientists say it’s increasingly clear that airborne virus particles help the coronavirus superspread. Here’s what they recommend to reduce the risks.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >VIDEO: How To Protect Yourself From Coronavirus That Can Linger In The Air : Goats and Soda : NPR

In some settings — especially poorly ventilated indoor rooms where many people are gathering — researchers increasingly believe that clouds of the virus expelled when someone speaks are able to stay aloft in the air and potentially infect people farther away than the recommended 6 feet of social distance.

In these settings, an infectious person shouting or laughing or coughing can release clouds containing the virus that can build up, linger and waft in the air — and then be inhaled by passersby and settle in their lungs.

You limit aerosol transmission by increasing ventilation and increasing air circulation,” says Seema Lakdawala, a flu researcher at University of Pittsburgh, which means opening the windows that surround you and putting fans in them, facing inward, to draw outside air in. That fresh air will scatter any clouds of virus that might exist. That way, you’re less likely to breathe in a big infectious dose.

When you can, move your get-together outside to a location where fresh air is all around you — a backyard, for example. Lakdawala’s neighborhood hosts happy hours, “where everybody brings a lawn chair and we sit on someone’s lawn. Everyone is spatially distanced and brings their own drink.”

Much of this is common knowledge by now, but make sure you wear your mask correctly — making sure that it fits snugly over your nose and mouth while not obstructing your ability to breathe — and that you keep a personal space bubble of at least 6 feet between you and other people.

The mask will catch a lot of the droplets that come out when you speak or laugh or cough — and also block some of other people’s droplets from getting into your nose and mouth.

Continue with full story at source link above.

Why Children Should Wear Face Masks | Duke Health

Superspreading Is A Hallmark Of The Coronavirus : Goats and Soda : NPR

>Superspreader News Last 20 days

That’s the word that one disease researcher uses to describe COVID-19. And now scientists are discovering the reasons that this virus is readily transmitted at “superspreader events.”

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >Superspreading Is A Hallmark Of The Coronavirus : Goats and Soda : NPR

“A person with a high viral load walks into a bar. That, according to researchers who study the novel coronavirus, is a recipe for a superspreading event — where one person or gathering leads to an unusually high number of new infections.

“And that kind of occurrence is increasingly considered a hallmark of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. “There are some really good estimates out there that suggest that between 10% and 20% of cases are responsible for about 80% of transmission events.

“And two of the main reasons, say researchers, are the way this coronavirus spreads and the behavior of infected individuals. A key feature that helps this virus superspread is its ability to transmit through the air in closed indoor settings,

“It appears to spread efficiently from people who don’t yet know they’re sick. Leung says research shows that 40% of coronavirus transmission is taking place before a patient shows symptoms. And people may actually be most contagious the day or two before they start feeling sick.

Viral load actually increases a couple of days before symptoms show up...The virus is spreading from one person’s respiratory tract to another’s — even though the person who’s spreading it may feel totally fine. It may come down to differences in biology, such as how much virus a person sheds in sighs and coughs and sneezes — or even how the virus comes out from the respiratory tract. That’s “bad news,” says Leung, and means that containing the coronavirus requires more intensive interventions than past disease outbreaks like SARS.

“So when a person with a high viral load walks into a crowded bar — one with poor ventilation and where nobody is wearing masks or social distancing — that’s a superspreading cocktail.

Continue with full story at source link above.

Spread Love Not Germs Clipart

 

 

CDC guidance does NOT imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months. All channels of today’s news snap judged the CDC guidance comments.

What??? I turned on the TV news this morning and they were all happy to state new reports from the CDC that we get 3 months free ride from coronavirus after quarantine!

“The CDC clarified on Friday that people who are infected with the coronavirus are not immune to reinfection in the following three months.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >CDC guidance does not imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months

  • “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clarified on Friday that its updated quarantine guidance does not imply people who are infected with the coronavirus are immune to reinfection.
  • It was reported in the news about CDC guidelines on quarantining, updated on Aug. 3, (seemed to) indicate that people who were once infected with the coronavirus are protected from reinfection for at least three months afterward.
  • The agency said it simply suggests retesting someone in the following three months after their initial infection is unnecessary unless that person shows symptoms that can’t be associated with another illness.

“Contrary to media reporting today, this science does not imply a person is immune to reinfection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the 3 months following infection,” the CDC said in a statement.

I think this shows how easy it is for the public (and pundits) who do not carefully, logically approach science and data continually misinterpret the facts.

Continue with full story at source link above.

 

That's My Story & I'm Sticking To It – Usefully Useless Information

 

 

Why Herd Immunity Won’t Save Us : Short Wave : NPR

>Fact Check: Johns Hopkins Graph Misinterpreted, Shared With Claim Of Herd Immunity Attained In USA Against COVID-19

>Coronavirus Today: The costs of herd immunity – Los Angeles Times

>Dr. Fauci On COVID ‘Herd Immunity’ | Moms.com

>Herd Immunity to COVID-19 Fails to Materialize in Sweden

“This pandemic has upended our world. It’s cost millions of people their jobs, closed schools, taken a lot of lives. It’s had such a huge effect in such a short period of time, so it’s understandable that many people comfort themselves by thinking this will pass; sooner or later, this virus will just go away.

13 minute podcast and Read full story of excerpts below at Source: >Why Herd Immunity Won’t Save Us : Short Wave : NPR

as good as herd immunity might look on paper, the real world is turning out to be a lot more complicated. All over the globe, millions are being infected, but the coronavirus is still here… “I think it’s going to be with us probably forever at this point. I mean, at a global scale, it’s going to be with us, and it’s how we decide to live with it… “herd immunity – what it is, why it became so popular in this pandemic and why it probably just isn’t going to happen.

“as soon as governments start floating these ideas of letting the virus pass through the population, scientists start projecting astronomical death counts that would result. And so herd immunity as an official policy basically dies before it ever gets started. There is just no way politically to embrace the strategy

“But the idea of natural herd immunity doesn’t really die. And this is what I find interesting. There’s still this sort of idea that somehow, the virus will eventually just vanish. And you’ve been hearing this a lot in recent weeks

Sweden never officially pursued a herd immunity approach, but they got kind of as close as any country has. They had this really light lockdown. They limited gatherings to 50 people or less, kept everything open with minor restrictions, like table-only seating at restaurants. And in the spring, Swedish officials were bragging that Stockholm might effectively reach herd immunity by the end of May.

Blood tests showed not that many people in Sweden have been infected with the coronavirus. It’s maybe 5%. And for natural herd immunity for this virus, that number has to reach more like 50% to 80%. Meanwhile, Sweden has had higher death rates than its Nordic neighbors like Norway, and their economy is suffering badly. So this has not worked well in practice.

Continue with full story at source link above.

485 Best Spiritual quotes by AiR images in 2020 | Spiritual quotes ...

Does Wearing a Mask Protect Me? Some Evidence Says Yes – The New York Times

>13 min podcast Wearing A Mask Could Be Even More Important Than We Thought : NPR One

People wearing face coverings will take in fewer coronavirus particles, evidence suggests, making disease less severe.

Full story of excerpts below at Source >Masks May Reduce Viral Dose, Some Experts Say

“as cases continue to rise across the country, experts are pointing to an array of evidence suggesting that masks also protect the people wearing them, lessening the severity of symptoms, or in some instances, staving off infection entirely.

“two researchers formally noted that mice exposed to larger quantities of germs were more likely to die. More recently, scientists have gone as far as to puff different amounts of a flu virus up the noses of human volunteers. The more virus in this nasal plume, they found, the likelier the participants were to get infected and experience symptoms.

Continue full story at source link above

Love this quote. We have a shared responsibility to protect ...

 

Watch Out for Little Superspreaders. Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds – The New York Times

>Risk of COVID-19 for kids: “The science is constantly evolving,” doctors say – CBS News

>97,000 children reportedly test positive for COVID-19 as schools gear up for instruction – CBS News

>Black And Hispanic Children At Risk For ‘Severe’ COVID-19 Symptoms, CDC Finds : NPR

Continue reading from excerpts below at source: >Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds

“Infected children have at least as much of the coronavirus in their noses and throats as infected adults, according to the research. Indeed, children younger than age 5 may host up to 100 times as much of the virus in the upper respiratory tract as adults, the authors found.” (And its hard to keep them wearing masks)

“But one takeaway from this is that we can’t assume that just because kids aren’t getting sick, or very sick, that they don’t have the virus…experts were alarmed to learn that young children may carry significant amounts of the coronavirus.

The results are consistent with those from a German study of 47 infected children between the ages 1 and 11, which showed that children who did not have symptoms had viral loads as high as adults’, or higher. And a recent study from France found that asymptomatic children had C.T. values similar to those of children with symptoms. C.T. values are a reasonable proxy for the amount of coronavirus present, said Dr. Kindrachuk, who relied on this metric during the Ebola outbreaks in West Africa.

Continue full story at source link above.

An Inspiring List of Kindness Quotes For Kids » AllWording.com

 

 

Covid-19 cases by age: Why more young people are getting sick – Vox

Mixed public health messages and misunderstandings of risk haven’t helped.

Full Story at Source: >Covid-19 cases by age: Why more young people are getting sick – Vox

“Nationwide, “the average age of people getting infected is now a decade and a half younger than it was a few months ago,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in a July 6 press briefing.

This seems to already be happening, with assisted living facility cases climbing in Houston and Phoenix, as well as in Florida now. “We first see it in the community, and then we see it in the residents and staff, and then you see the deaths,” David Grabowski, a health care policy expert at Harvard Medical School, told the Wall Street Journal.

“A higher percentage of young people — and a lower percentage of elderly people — getting infected could seem like a good thing. For one, it should mean fewer deaths. It also should mean less strain on the health care system and its workers. But in the states with larger outbreaks, including Arizona and Texas, hospitals are already getting overwhelmed with young and old alike.

“The social isolation of shutdowns also seems to be taking a much higher psychological toll on younger than older adults, and is potentially driving them to gather in risky indoor settings. A CDC study in May found that nearly half of all 18- to 29-year-olds surveyed had been feeling at least some symptoms of anxiety or depression — a higher proportion than for other age groups (which was closer to one-third for those 30 to 59). (The CDC now also offers specific guidance for teens and young adults who might be struggling.)

Read much more at source link above.

“It is only when I am alone that I really feel connected to the entire universe.”
― Nurudeen Ushawu

The wonderful mountain skyline of Austria, partly hidden in clouds and mist.

Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Go To A ‘Covid Party’ or ANY Party

“A 30 year old male died after recently attending a ‘Covid party’ in San Antonio, Texas. The motivation for holding such parties appears to be a curiosity if the virus is real, and to see if anyone gets infected.

>Wikipedia on Coronavirus party

See Full Story at Source: >Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Go To A ‘Covid Party’

“Do you still believe that SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for Covid-19, is a hoax? Well a 30 year old male in San Antonio, Texas who recently attended a “Covid party” believing that the virus might be a hoax is now dead. He reportedly told nurses before he died this week at Methodist Hospital in San Antonio, “I think I made a mistake. I thought this was a hoax, but it’s not.”

“Dr. Jane Appleby, the Chief Medical Officer for Methodist Hospital and Methodist Children’s Hospital, released a statement indicating that the man had attended a gathering with an infected individual to determine if the coronavirus was real. He wanted to see whether he could get infected after attending the event. Appleby shared the story as a warning to others throughout the US, where coronavirus cases are surging in a majority of states:

“The basis for holding Covid parties, so the thinking goes, is similar to the concept of holding a “chicken pox party” in order to get the disease and just “get it over with,” in order to gain immunity. But the two diseases are quite different and “getting it over with” likely holds a higher degree of uncertainty with respect to Covid-19.

“The CDC has warned that people infected with the coronavirus should not attend gatherings or parties. Simply put, any event where people do not practice social distancing and do not consistently wear face coverings represent significant risk for transmission. Such is also the case with congregating at bars— due to alcohol’s ability to reduce inhibitions, encouraging people to gather closer while speaking, spreading virus-laden droplets which may become airborne, existing as aerosols for up to 3 hours.

Continue with full story at source link above.

Texas Doctors Create Coronavirus Activity Risk Guide: ‘The Public Needs More Directed Guidance’ – CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

The Texas Medical Association put together a guide to help people navigate the pandemic with a 1-9 scale that measures the risk from low to high.

Read full story at Source: >Texas Doctors Create Coronavirus Activity Risk Guide: ‘The Public Needs More Directed Guidance’ – CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

>PDF Guide Chart

“A group of Texas doctors have created a guide to help people measure the risk of COVID-19 from nearly 40 daily activities.  the guide focused on 37 activities covering everything from hugs and handshakes to attending stadium-sized events. They are ranked as a guide to help people decide which ones elevate the danger of contracting COVID-19.

“The lowest risk on the 1-9 scale comes from opening mail which some people worry will carry the virus. Grocery shopping, restaurant take out and activities like jogging, golf and tennis are all considered low risk. But hair salons, dine in restaurants, air travel, fitness centers and even hugs or handshakes are ranked as moderately high risk or above. Engaging in contact sports and visiting a movie theater are also identified as a lot less safe than sitting in a doctors waiting room or swimming in a public pool.

Continue with full story at source link above

Coronavirus can float in air — and experts say WHO and CDC should tell people that | KTLA

>NPR 10 minute podcast: Scientists Debate How Coronavirus Spreads, Experts Push For Mask Mandate

>The Scientists Debate: Is COVID-19 transmitted by airborne aerosols?

>Major News Outlets: Is COVID Airborne? 239 Scientists Say Evidence Shows It Is, Urge WHO, CDC To Alter Recommendations

“Most public health organizations, including the World Health Organization, do not recognize airborne transmission except for aerosol-generating procedures performed in healthcare settings. Hand washing and social distancing are appropriate, but in our view, insufficient to provide protection from virus-carrying respiratory microdroplets released into the air by infected people,”

‘They don’t want to talk about airborne transmission because that is going to make people afraid’

Read full story at Source: >Coronavirus can float in air — and experts say WHO and CDC should tell people that | KTLA

“Studies by the signatories and other scientists have demonstrated beyond any reasonable doubt that viruses are released during exhalation, talking, and coughing in microdroplets small enough to remain aloft in air and pose a risk of exposure at distances beyond 1 to 2 meters (yards) from an infected individual,”

“For example, at typical indoor air velocities, a 5 nanometre droplet will travel tens of meters, much greater than the scale of a typical room, while settling from a height of 1.5 metres (about five feet) to the floor.” What’s not clearly understood is how important droplet size is to coronavirus transmission,

“A lot of people crowded close together indoors where it is poorly ventilated — that is what drives the pandemic,” … A loud bar, where people must raise their voices to be heard, is a perfect storm of close contact, poor air circulation and people generating a lot of virus-carrying particles by talking, laughing and shouting.

Advice to avoid coronavirus transmission:

“I am very much concerned about the general public and schools and ventilation in school buildings and in dorms on college campuses and in bars and in churches and where people sing and where people congregate,” 

• Provide sufficient and effective ventilation (supply clean outdoor air, minimize recirculating air) particularly in public buildings, workplace environments, schools, hospitals and age care homes.

• Supplement general ventilation with airborne infection controls such as local exhaust, high efficiency air filtration, and germicidal ultraviolet lights. (These would be placed high up in the ceiling to avoid damage to people’s eyes and skin)

• Avoid overcrowding, particularly in public transport and public buildings.

“Such measures are practical and often can be easily implemented; many are not costly, For example, simple steps such as opening both doors and windows can dramatically increase air flow rates in many buildings…In buildings, carbon dioxide monitors can help managers know if the air is being refreshed properly.

“In a car, open windows and make sure the air conditioning or heat is not recirculated but set to include outside air.

Continue reading full story at source link above.

A Nation Of Magical Thinkers | Blog For Iowa

I first heard the term “magical thinking” on ‘What you need to know” ABC news daily series yesterday from Dr. Jenifer Ashton. The term is a medical term in psychology to describe illogical thought patterns which ignores new evidence that challenges current non-scientific theories that are really beliefs. — DH

Full story at Source: >A Nation Of Magical Thinkers | Blog For Iowa

“COVID-19 has revealed our societal failure to understand what evidence is and to respect how it works. National and local political leaders have made decisions that ignored the evidence. Members of the general public have proved slow to accept the evidence. Measures adopted to help flatten the curve have been met with virulent protests, despite the evidence that they are working.”

“We have become a nation of magical thinkers, making decisions based on what we hope is the case and whom we want to believe.  When confronted with opposing evidence, we do not engage with it. We dismiss it and stick a label on it: “fake,” “phony,” “biased,” etc. And then we mistake that label for evidence.”

 

Older Adults and Covid-19 | CDC

“Among adults, the risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults at highest risk. Severe illness means that the person with COVID-19 may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die.

Full story at Source: >Older Adults | CDC

“your risk of getting severely ill from COVID-19 increases as you get older. In fact, 8 out of 10 COVID-19-related deaths reported in the United States have been among adults aged 65 years and older.

“The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to:

“If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours

the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19.

  • If you decide to engage in public activities, continue to protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
  • Keep these items on hand and use them when venturing out: a cloth face covering, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible.
  • If possible, avoid others who are not wearing cloth face coverings or ask others around you to wear cloth face coverings.

For full extensive details continue at CDC site source link above

COVID-19 Contact Tracing | CDC

>After COVID-19 Contact Tracing Comes Quarantine. Here’s How That Works : Shots – Health News : NPR

Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps keep you, your family, and your community safe.

Full CDC site on contact tracing at Source: >COVID-19 Contact Tracing | CDC

“Contact tracing is used by health departments to prevent the spread of infectious disease. In general, contact tracing involves identifying people who have an infectious disease (cases) and people who they came in contact with (contacts) and working with them to interrupt disease spread. This includes asking people with COVID-19 to >isolate and their contacts to >quarantine at home voluntarily.

“To prevent the further spread of disease, people who had contact with someone with COVID-19 are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others until 14 days after their last exposure to a person with COVID-19. Contacts should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for symptoms of COVID-19.

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may call you to check-in on your health, discuss who you’ve been in contact with, and ask where you spent time while you may have been infectious and able to spread COVID-19 to others. You will also be asked to stay at home and >self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

Continue at CDC source link above for full details.

New amendment? Right to selfish ignorance: Arizonans see big jump in coronavirus cases, but don’t see reason to wear masks

Arizonans see big jump in coronavirus cases, but don’t see reason to wear masks

View video news report and full story at Source: >Arizona seeing big jump in coronavirus cases – CNN

“Tempe, Arizona (CNN) Walking along the streets this week in Tempe, Arizona, it was rare to see anyone wearing a mask. Patrons at a bar packed the entire space, as if the pandemic had suddenly dissipated. This despite the news that the state is one of the growing coronavirus hotspots in the country.

“The Arizona Department of Health Sciences on Friday announced there were 3,246 new Covid-19 cases, a record number reported on one day.
Arizona was one of the first states to reopen but the impact of the virus is everywhere in Tempe as some businesses are still shut down.

“When asked why he wasn’t wearing a mask, he replied, “I think masks are good, but they act as a placebo. I have family personally lost to coronavirus, so like, I should be wearing a mask, but not when I’m out with my friends.”

“Please keep yourself and your family safe. Always wear a mask in public even if you do not feel sick. Maintain physical distancing. Let’s work together to slow the spread of COVID-19. #MaskUpAZ,” the Arizona Department of Health Sciences said in a tweet on Friday. Phoenix has ordered residents to wear masks, one of more than a dozen cities across the state to announce local mask ordinances.

“Alarmed by the rapid increase in cases, more than 3,000 doctors and nurses sent a letter to Gov. Doug Ducey this week urging him to mandate masks. Ducey said he would not order a state mandate, instead leaving it up to local governments.

“To tell the whole world that basically I’m a social Darwinist if you die, I don’t care, I just want my beer and burger is, is really … I mean even kindergarteners have more empathy for other people.”

Big WHO Mixup: Asymptomatic Vs Presymptomatic: How The Virus Spreads : NPR

“Scientists at the World Health Organization were having a virtual press conference, a normal thing they do, just giving updates on the virus and how it’s moving around the world. And then something kind of confusing happens.

10 minute podcast and read full transcript of podcast at Source: >Asymptomatic Vs Presymptomatic: How The Virus Spreads : Short Wave : NPR

“Maria Van Kerkhove, who’s one of WHO’s top epidemiologists…

“listening to Van Kerkhove, you’d think – well, why did we lock down? Why do we wear masks? She left listeners with the impression that anyone without symptoms had a low chance of spreading the virus. And that’s wrong. We know – and there’s documented evidence for this – that the virus can be spread by people without symptoms.

“So this statement was reported on by news outlets. You know, the WHO is a major global health organization. What they say matters. And that scientist, Maria Van Kerkhove had to kind of walk this back.

“There was a lot of reaction and pressure from researchers and the public. People were saying that it was confusing at best or actually wrong at worst.

this mix-up with the WHO was partly about a distinction between asymptomatic people and what scientists are calling pre-symptomatic people.

“Asymptomatic, which is the group that Van Kerkhove was referring to, these are coronavirus carriers who are infected but they never end up showing any symptoms. They feel fine the whole time. And then there’s another group called pre-symptomatic. And these are people who’ve been infected. They haven’t gotten sick yet, but they will. And they can definitely spread the virus, we think, up to three days before they start showing symptoms. There’s plenty of evidence for this.

“But here’s the catch. You can’t tell if someone is asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic until one of them starts showing symptoms. And even if there are asymptomatic people out there that seem to be transmitting the virus less, there are documented cases where it’s happened. So what Van Kerkhove says she meant to say is that she has not seen evidence that people who are truly asymptomatic are out there effectively spreading the virus to a lot of other people.

“if you’re not actively sick, if you’re not running your nose everywhere – spreading coronavirus seems to require situations where people are hanging out really close together, mostly indoors, and doing things that project their voice and breath and spread respiratory droplets. So it’s situations like singing in a choir or panting during a dance class at the gym or shouting to be heard in a nightclub. These are all activities that have reportedly led to virus transmission.

 

Coronavirus Lockdowns Saved Millions Of Lives, Journal ‘Nature’ Reports : NPR

“When it comes to controlling the spread of the coronavirus, stay-at-home orders work. Two new studies published in the journal Nature say millions of lives have been saved worldwide.

Listen to 3 minute podcast and read full story at Source: >Coronavirus Lockdowns Saved Millions Of Lives, Journal ‘Nature’ Reports : NPR

“Samir Bhatt from Imperial College London, who worked on one of the papers published in Nature. His team analyzed infection and death rates across 11 European nations through early May. They estimate that 3 million more people in those countries would’ve died if lockdowns had not been put in place.

“Nature also just published a separate study from the Global Policy Lab at the University of California, Berkeley. That study analyzed lockdowns in China, South Korea, Iran, France, Italy and the United States. It found that the lockdowns in those six countries averted 62 million cases. In the U.S., for example, there were 360,000 cases by early April. Without lockdowns and other interventions, the researchers at Berkeley calculate that the U.S. would’ve had 14 times that number by April 6. Solomon Hsiang from Berkeley says these unprecedented shelter-in-place orders came at an extreme cost. And when governments ordered them, it was unclear exactly how great the social benefits would be.

Bhatt says this pandemic is far from over. And as much as people want to get back to normal, he cautions that people need to understand how much of a positive impact the lockdown measures have been having. 

Coping with coronavirus – Harvard Health

Harvard Health Publishing Logo


Dealing with daily stress, anxiety, and a range of other emotions

4 Videos and 4 podcasts and Full story of excerpts below at Source: >Coping with coronavirus – Harvard Health

“Perhaps you’re older, worried that you may become infected and seriously ill. Maybe you’re doing your best to keep your family healthy while trying to balance work with caring for your children while schools are closed. Or you’re feeling isolated, separated from friends and loved ones during this period of social distancing.

“Regardless of your specific circumstances, it’s likely that you’re wondering how to cope with the stress, anxiety, and other feelings that are surfacing. A variety of stress management techniques, which we delve into (resource link above), can help.

COVID-19 Is Likely Airborne, Aerosol Scientist Says


Something has been bothering Kimberly Prather, PhD: everything she reads about COVID-19 points to a pathogen that travels through the air.

>Reducing transmission of Coronavirus, AAAS Science
(Sars-CoV-2 is the latest Coronavirus)

Full story of excerpts below on Medscape at Source: >COVID-19 Is Likely Airborne, Aerosol Scientist Says

A lot of the evidence has been pointing to aerosol transmission of respiratory viruses,”  Influenza can be passed through the air, as can the virus that causes SARS. “This particular virus, a lot of evidence is mounting. ..she’s been alarmed not to see the CDC or WHO come out with a strong statement that people could catch COVID-19 by breathing it in.

“…masks can play a major role in stopping that transmission. When you sing, the amount of droplets and aerosol that come out is really, in some respects, scary…When a person coughs or sneezes, they generate large droplets laden with viral particles. Those droplets are heavy and fall to the ground or a nearby surface pretty quickly, within seconds. They are still somewhat wet and sticky when they land.

“That’s where the 6-foot rule comes in… It’s based on studies of respiratory droplets conducted in the 1930s. Aerosols…can accumulate, remain infectious in indoor air for hours, and be easily inhaled deeply into the lungs this is a scary thing to be telling people. “I hesitate. I don’t want to freak people out.” She also believes knowledge is power.

“I have to say something because this could actually protect people,” she says. What airborne transmission means, she says, is that 6 feet is not far enough to stand apart. It also means we should probably be wearing masks a lot more often.

What’s the Future? Look at the past, we never learn. The 1892 Cholera Outbreak

 3 Minute podcast and full story of excerpts below at Source: >What Hamburg’s Missteps In 1892 Cholera Outbreak Can Teach Us About COVID-19 Response : NPR

“As British scholar Richard Evans researched the history of pandemics for a book more than 30 years ago, he was struck by the uniformity of how governments from different cultures and different historical periods responded. “Almost every epidemic you can think of, the first reaction of any government is to say, ‘No, no, it’s not here. We haven’t got it,'” he says. “Or ‘it’s only mild’ or ‘it’s not going to have a big effect.’

“In nearly every case, says Evans, governments that made these assurances turned out to be wrong — sometimes exceptionally so, as he outlined in his 1987 book, Death in Hamburg: Society and Politics in the Cholera Years, about that city’s outbreak 130 years ago. As the world comes to terms with how governments have responded to today’s coronavirus pandemic, some are looking to history to guide them. Evans is a knighted historian best known for his trilogy of books about the Third Reich, but his study of late-19th-century Hamburg also serves as a guidebook with lessons for political leaders managing today’s COVID-19 crisis.

“Chief among those lessons is the need “to have proper precautions in place,” Evans says, “proper measures in reserve to roll out when an epidemic hits. And not to try and hush it up or try and deny its existence. Then it has fatal consequences for many, many people.”That’s what happened in 1892 Hamburg.  The German city-state was run by merchant families who put trade and economy above residents’ welfare.

“About a decade earlier, German microbiologist Robert Koch identified the bacteria present in one of the deadly diseases of the day, cholera, which is transmitted via excrement in water. The discovery that cholera was waterborne had spurred several of Europe’s largest cities to invest in filtration systems for their municipal water supplies — but not Hamburg. Its leaders refused to spend anything to treat its city water. Evans says the city’s water supply was so rich in biological organisms that a dissertation from the 1880s — titled “The Fauna of the Hamburg Water Supply” — outlined more than 50 kinds of creatures living in it. Hamburg’s leaders claimed cholera was spread by an invisible vapor no government could hope to prevent.

“But in August 1892, the excrement of a Russian migrant ill with cholera ended up in the Elbe River, which the city drew on for its municipal water.”And it was delivered to everyone who had a water supply connection,” says Evans. “And 10,000 people died, roughly speaking, within about six weeks. It was an absolute catastrophe.

Hamburg’s government waited six days after discovering that people were dying from cholera to tell anyone. By then, thousands were ill. The only way out was to invite Koch, then Germany’s top scientist, to guide them. Authorities eventually were able to rein in the cholera outbreak by imposing restrictions on people’s movements, disinfecting homes and ordering people to only drink water from a clean water supply built after the outbreak.

In a situation of an ongoing outbreak, the attention of the public focuses on the scientists providing information,” says Christoph Gradmann, a medical historian at the University of Oslo.Gradmann says the lesson from Hamburg’s cholera epidemic is that health institutions need political support and adequate funding before an epidemic hits.

Countries with strong public health systems are able to respond well,” he says. “If you have a big public health system that provides good data, that’s a very good thing to have.”A year after the cholera outbreak, Hamburg’s fed-up citizenry voted their incompetent businessmen leaders out of office. They replaced the merchants with leaders who belonged to the Social Democrats, a working-class party that prioritized science and health over profit.

 

Black light experiment video from Japan shows how quickly a virus like Covid-19 can spread at a restaurant – CNN


Read full story of excerpt below at Source: >Black light experiment video from Japan shows how quickly a virus like Covid-19 can spread at a restaurant – CNN

“(CNN) A viral video from Japan aims to show how easily germs and viruses can spread in restaurants when just one person is infected.The experiment simulates the atmosphere at a buffet restaurant or on a cruise ship. It was conducted by the public broadcasting organization NHK in conjunction with health experts.The video shows 10 people coming into the restaurant, with one singled out as an “infected” person. A fluorescent substance only visible under black light is applied onto that person’s hands, representing germs from a cough or a sneeze. Each participant then goes about the buffet as they normally would, not considering a potential contamination. At the end of the video, the participants are cast under black lights illuminating where the “(simulated) infection” has spread.

“While these kinds of experiments are not new, John Nicholls, a clinical professor in pathology at Hong Kong University, said they demonstrate how quickly a virus can spread, especially when hand washing is not performed.”What the video demonstrated, is that it will spread to surfaces and to people very efficiently,” But both experts said the experiment is a good way to show the importance of hand washing and hygiene.

Health Safety Tips For When It’s Time To Emerge From Lockdowns : NPR


>How Is The Federal Government Doing At Guiding A Smart Reopening?

6 minute podcast and full page of below excerpts at Source: >Health Safety Tips For When It’s Time To Emerge From Lockdowns : NPR

“As more states continue to ease shelter-in-place restrictions, what are the safest ways to get back out into society — whether it’s outdoors, going to church or returning to work? What are the safest ways to move around as we start to do it more? An end to lockdowns is coming. NPR’s Allison Aubrey joins us to talk through the options for going outdoors or to church or returning to work…

people are moving around more. Using cellphone location data, researchers have seen about a 20% decline in the percentage of people staying home compared to two weeks ago. And it’s also worth noting who seems to be going out most. Some new survey data out of the U.K. shows during lockdown about 50% of adolescent boys and young men – so college-aged males – acknowledge meeting up with a group of friends. And many parents in the U.S. have seen this growing restlessness.

“The data suggests that prolonged indoor contact is the riskiest. Being outside is lower risk. So over the last week or so, we’ve seen several states giving the green light to outdoor activities – exercising on the beach or in parks, tennis, golf, boating. We’re also hearing more about small gatherings in people’s yards.

“There’s better air circulation outside, more sunlight. It’s often easier to stay 6 feet away when you’re in someone’s backyard than their living room. But Carroll says it can be a slippery slope. You know, once people gather, you have to be careful about maintaining social distancing.

many cases are transmitted at home. So one way is a family member who’s an essential worker brings it home to everyone else, so really important for that essential worker, you know, to wash hands, take precautions. And the more people who gather in a home, the more risk.

“there’s very good reason we’re being asked to wear masks. … it’s impossible to say just how many infections that masks may prevent. Mostly the masks do help prevent the person wearing it from spreading the virus.  When I see someone wearing a mask, it says two things to me. They care about the people around them, and they care and respect themselves. …it’s worth pointing out the CDC is recommending that we wear them, and we’ll continue to see this as more people go back to work and perhaps on public transport. ..when people are on public transport or back at work, they’re quite likely indoors, which makes that kind of thing vital.

employers are thinking about things like screening, antibody testing. A lot of employers are scrambling, trying to come up safety measures for reopening. One idea being floated in some countries is the idea of an immunity passport or a health passport so people who have had the virus and presumably have some immunity would be identified and perhaps cleared to go to work.

“But physician Aaron Carroll says this is really not as simple as it sounds. “First of all, we should acknowledge that we don’t even understand yet how good immunity is, how long it lasts, how much it’s protective. So to start labeling people immune is really jumping the gun. We just don’t know yet.

 

Social Distancing, Masks Key As States Loosen Restrictions, Researcher Says : NPR


>Mobile Phone Data Show More Americans Are Leaving Their Homes, Despite Orders

>U.S. Coronavirus Testing Still Falls Short. How’s Your State Doing?

>Coronavirus cases: These states face biggest potential shortfalls in hospital ICU beds

Full interview of below at Source: >Social Distancing, Masks Key As States Loosen Restrictions, Researcher Says : NPR

“More and more states are easing restrictions and moving to reopen their economies, and we’re seeing data showing that more and more people are going outside. I spoke about this with Crystal Watson. She’s a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, and she’s worried about these trends.

“My message would be that social distancing is still the key right now. Even if you’re outside, you need to maintain that distance of over 6 feet. You need to wear a mask, as being recommended by the CDC. And try to avoid people as much as possible because this hasn’t gone away. It will ramp up again as we start to come together.

“I think we will start to see hospitalizations begin to go up again. There’s a bit of a lag as people get infected and they have an incubation period. So we may not see it right away, but we will start to see more cases in hospitals and more very sick people.

“Are you confident that there’s the amount of testing in place that’s needed, the amount of contact tracing in place to move into another phase here? No…I don’t think that there is anywhere in the country right now that truly has the capacities in place to test everyone we need to test and to trace all of their contacts.

“There are states that are doing better, and my state of Maryland is really ramping up testing because they’ve acquired additional tests. But I don’t think anyone’s quite there yet. And those capacities are really, really critical to manage this on a case-by-case basis. Otherwise, I fear that we will see big epidemics of this virus again.

“And it may cause us to have to go back under social distancing measures… I think the focus really should be on creating these capacities both to test and to trace contacts because that’s how we manage this on a case-by-case level. And it will make it much safer going forward.

“It’s also a more sustainable approach because we’re going to need to practice these measures until we hopefully have a safe and effective vaccine. And – so if we are really able to control the virus and find nearly every case, we can prevent a lot of illnesses and deaths and prevent us from having to go back under social distancing measures.