Tag Archives: Immunity

When is the best time to get a flu shot? Flu shots near me DC | wusa9.com

>When is the best time to get a flu shot? Flu shots near me DC | wusa9.com

>When Dr. Anthony Fauci gets his flu shot and why

>Is There an Optimal Time to Get Your Flu Shot This Year?

“While October is a target date to get the shot by, health experts say any protection is better than none. Here’s why some say October is best.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >When is the best time to get a flu shot? Flu shots near me DC | wusa9.com

“You’ve probably noticed signs posted at pharmacies and grocery stores let you know you can get a flu shot now.  But should you?

QUESTION: Is there a time that’s best to get the vaccine? ANSWER: Yes, during the month of October. SOURCES: Three practicing physicians: Dr.Stuart Ray, LaTasha Perkins and Linda Fu. The Centers for Disease Control and Preventionm and the Immunization Action Coalition or I-A-C, an educational non-profit that works with the CDC.

Dr. Stuart Ray, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins, says October is your best bet to get the flu shot. According to Ray, that’s when flu season really starts to pick up. “The most important thing is to get it when it’s available. Certainly, the best time is probably before the end of October”. Our other experts agree, like family medicine doctor LaTasha Perkins and pediatrician doctor Linda Fu. “October is going to be the optimum month to get it,” Perkins agreed.

Continue reading much more at source link above.

50 Trust Quotes That Prove Trust is Everything

 

 

CDC guidance does NOT imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months. All channels of today’s news snap judged the CDC guidance comments.

What??? I turned on the TV news this morning and they were all happy to state new reports from the CDC that we get 3 months free ride from coronavirus after quarantine!

“The CDC clarified on Friday that people who are infected with the coronavirus are not immune to reinfection in the following three months.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >CDC guidance does not imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months

  • “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clarified on Friday that its updated quarantine guidance does not imply people who are infected with the coronavirus are immune to reinfection.
  • It was reported in the news about CDC guidelines on quarantining, updated on Aug. 3, (seemed to) indicate that people who were once infected with the coronavirus are protected from reinfection for at least three months afterward.
  • The agency said it simply suggests retesting someone in the following three months after their initial infection is unnecessary unless that person shows symptoms that can’t be associated with another illness.

“Contrary to media reporting today, this science does not imply a person is immune to reinfection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the 3 months following infection,” the CDC said in a statement.

I think this shows how easy it is for the public (and pundits) who do not carefully, logically approach science and data continually misinterpret the facts.

Continue with full story at source link above.

 

That's My Story & I'm Sticking To It – Usefully Useless Information

 

 

Why Herd Immunity Won’t Save Us : Short Wave : NPR

>Fact Check: Johns Hopkins Graph Misinterpreted, Shared With Claim Of Herd Immunity Attained In USA Against COVID-19

>Coronavirus Today: The costs of herd immunity – Los Angeles Times

>Dr. Fauci On COVID ‘Herd Immunity’ | Moms.com

>Herd Immunity to COVID-19 Fails to Materialize in Sweden

“This pandemic has upended our world. It’s cost millions of people their jobs, closed schools, taken a lot of lives. It’s had such a huge effect in such a short period of time, so it’s understandable that many people comfort themselves by thinking this will pass; sooner or later, this virus will just go away.

13 minute podcast and Read full story of excerpts below at Source: >Why Herd Immunity Won’t Save Us : Short Wave : NPR

as good as herd immunity might look on paper, the real world is turning out to be a lot more complicated. All over the globe, millions are being infected, but the coronavirus is still here… “I think it’s going to be with us probably forever at this point. I mean, at a global scale, it’s going to be with us, and it’s how we decide to live with it… “herd immunity – what it is, why it became so popular in this pandemic and why it probably just isn’t going to happen.

“as soon as governments start floating these ideas of letting the virus pass through the population, scientists start projecting astronomical death counts that would result. And so herd immunity as an official policy basically dies before it ever gets started. There is just no way politically to embrace the strategy

“But the idea of natural herd immunity doesn’t really die. And this is what I find interesting. There’s still this sort of idea that somehow, the virus will eventually just vanish. And you’ve been hearing this a lot in recent weeks

Sweden never officially pursued a herd immunity approach, but they got kind of as close as any country has. They had this really light lockdown. They limited gatherings to 50 people or less, kept everything open with minor restrictions, like table-only seating at restaurants. And in the spring, Swedish officials were bragging that Stockholm might effectively reach herd immunity by the end of May.

Blood tests showed not that many people in Sweden have been infected with the coronavirus. It’s maybe 5%. And for natural herd immunity for this virus, that number has to reach more like 50% to 80%. Meanwhile, Sweden has had higher death rates than its Nordic neighbors like Norway, and their economy is suffering badly. So this has not worked well in practice.

Continue with full story at source link above.

485 Best Spiritual quotes by AiR images in 2020 | Spiritual quotes ...

Covid-19 cases by age: Why more young people are getting sick – Vox

Mixed public health messages and misunderstandings of risk haven’t helped.

Full Story at Source: >Covid-19 cases by age: Why more young people are getting sick – Vox

“Nationwide, “the average age of people getting infected is now a decade and a half younger than it was a few months ago,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in a July 6 press briefing.

This seems to already be happening, with assisted living facility cases climbing in Houston and Phoenix, as well as in Florida now. “We first see it in the community, and then we see it in the residents and staff, and then you see the deaths,” David Grabowski, a health care policy expert at Harvard Medical School, told the Wall Street Journal.

“A higher percentage of young people — and a lower percentage of elderly people — getting infected could seem like a good thing. For one, it should mean fewer deaths. It also should mean less strain on the health care system and its workers. But in the states with larger outbreaks, including Arizona and Texas, hospitals are already getting overwhelmed with young and old alike.

“The social isolation of shutdowns also seems to be taking a much higher psychological toll on younger than older adults, and is potentially driving them to gather in risky indoor settings. A CDC study in May found that nearly half of all 18- to 29-year-olds surveyed had been feeling at least some symptoms of anxiety or depression — a higher proportion than for other age groups (which was closer to one-third for those 30 to 59). (The CDC now also offers specific guidance for teens and young adults who might be struggling.)

Read much more at source link above.

“It is only when I am alone that I really feel connected to the entire universe.”
― Nurudeen Ushawu

The wonderful mountain skyline of Austria, partly hidden in clouds and mist.

Some People May Have a Head Start Against Coronavirus, Surprising Evidence Shows


 A hidden weapon that could help fight off the virus.

>Targets of T Cell Responses to SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus in Humans with COVID-19 Disease and Unexposed Individuals

Read much more from below excerpts at Source: >Some People May Have a Head Start Against Coronavirus, Surprising Evidence Shows

“Some people’s immune systems may have a head start in fighting the coronavirus, recent research suggested. A study published last month in the journal Cell showed that some people who have never been exposed to the coronavirus have helper T cells that are capable of recognizing and responding to it.

“The likeliest explanation for the surprising finding, according to the researchers, is a phenomenon called cross-reactivity: when helper T cells developed in response to another virus react to a similar but previously unknown pathogen. In this case, those T cells may be left over from people’s previous exposure to a different coronavirus – likely one of the four that cause common colds.

“The immune memory is related to the event. If it’s a strong event, you’ll have a strong memory, If you almost got run over by a truck, you’ll remember it, but you may not remember the color of the socks you wore yesterday because it’s not a big deal….it’d be interesting to study people with severe disease and compare the T-cell response between them and those with mild disease. That’s next on the docket, …”We’re looking to identify T-cell response in the critically hospitalized,” he said. “It’s being done as we speak.”

 

Antibody Testing Is Increasing, But A Positive Result Doesn’t Prove Immunity : Shots – Health News : NPR


As more and more people get tested for antibodies to the coronavirus, infectious disease specialists worry that those tested — and their employers — may not understand the limits of the results.

>Google search on this topic, last month: 

5 minute podcast and read full story at Source: >Antibody Testing Is Increasing, But A Positive Result Doesn’t Prove Immunity : Shots – Health News : NPR

“It’s still not certain that antibodies measured by such a test would protect him from catching the virus again. And if the antibodies are protective, it’s unknown how strong that protection might be or how long it might last. There are also questions about the reliability of many antibody tests being sold.

“Researchers are urgently trying to answer those uncertainties and figure how best to conduct antibody testing. Nevertheless, increasing numbers of people are getting the tests — many without recognizing how much is still unknown about what the results mean.

“the antibody tests are only a sign of past infection. Whether the infection is actually gone can only be determined by a diagnostic test that identifies genetic material from the virus or viral particles. Some people also falsely think testing positive on an antibody test proves they can’t get infected with the virus again.

Read full story at Source: >Antibody Testing Is Increasing, But A Positive Result Doesn’t Prove Immunity : Shots – Health News : NPR

Antibody, Antigen And PCR Tests For COVID-19: Know The Differences : Shots – Health News : NPR


>Google News Full Coverage

>Update: FDA Cracks Down On Antibody Tests For Coronavirus

“Testing for the coronavirus has been very much in the news. The first and most urgent focus is on increasing access to tests to diagnose people with current infections. But now other tests are appearing as well. Antibody tests, which can identify people with signs of past infection, are starting to be available. And a third type of test is on the way.

“Here’s a quick guide to sorting out the pluses and minuses to each type of test:

“Diagnostic or PCR test. What it does: Doctors use this test to diagnose people who are currently sick with COVID-19. This is the one we’ve been hearing so much about. How it works: This test uses a sample of mucus typically taken from a person’s nose or throat. The test may also work on saliva — that’s under investigation. It looks for the genetic material of the coronavirus. The test uses a technology called PCR (polymerase chain reaction), which greatly amplifies the viral genetic material if it is present. That material is detectable when a person is actively infected.

” How accurate is it: Generally speaking, these are the most reliable tests. However, a few days may pass before the virus starts replicating in the throat and nose, so the test won’t identify someone who has recently been infected. And swabs can sometimes fail to pick up signs of active infection. How quick is it: These samples are generally sent to centralized labs for analysis, so it can take several days to get results back. Wait times were longer earlier in the pandemic because of a testing backlog. There are also two rapid PCR tests, which can be run on specialized equipment already widely distributed throughout the U.S. The speediest one, by Abbott Laboratories, can provide a result in 13 minutes, but one study suggests this test can miss more than 10% of cases.

“Antibody test. What it does: Antibody tests identify people who have previously been infected with the coronavirus. They do not show whether a person is currently infected. This is primarily a good way to track the spread of the coronavirus through a population. How it works: This is a blood test. It looks for antibodies to the coronavirus. Your body produces antibodies in response to an infectious agent such as a virus. These antibodies generally arise after four days to more than a week after infection, so they are not used to diagnose current disease.

“How accurate is it: There are more than 120 antibody tests on the market. The Food and Drug Administration has allowed them to be marketed without FDA authorization, and quality is a great concern. A few tests have voluntarily submitted to extra FDA approval. Other tests are being validated by individual medical labs or university researchers. In general, these tests aren’t reliable enough for individuals to act based on the results. And researchers say, even if you were certain you had antibodies to the coronavirus, it’s still unknown if that protects you from getting sick again. Still, these tests can provide good information about rates of infection in a community, where errors in an individual result have less impact. How quick is it: These tests generally produce results in a few minutes, based on a drop of blood taken from the finger. Some research labs use a more sophisticated antibody test, called an Elisa (Enzyme-linked immunoassay) that are more accurate but are not as widely available.

Continue reading more and third type of test not available yet at Source: >Antibody, Antigen And PCR Tests For COVID-19: Know The Differences : Shots – Health News : NPR

What It Takes To Be A Contact Tracer : NPR Do you have empathy? Welcome to the new economy


Riding the Tidal Wave of the Coming Public Health Economy

5 min podcast >A Day In The Life Of A Coronavirus Contact Tracer

Are the US and state governments being dragged kicking and screaming into an unprecedented massive investment for contact tracing? As governments extol the quick recovery from the virus pandemic, experts keep talking of repeating infection waves since our fragmented bureaucracy cannot get a handle what the virus is really doing in this country until massive resources are committed to tracking it down. Fighting over costs will be swept away into absolute submission and a new economy. Other countries and a few States are leading the way. Watch for new remote and compassionate footwork jobs to start appearing. Contract tracing needs empathy. Everyone is frightened when contacted. — DH

“NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with John Welch, the director of partnerships & operations for Massachusetts’ COVID-19 response at Partners In Health, about their contact tracing program and training.

“Public health experts say that one of the keys to safely lifting stay-at-home orders around the country is contact tracing. So we wanted to spend some time now learning more about what it takes to implement a statewide contact tracing program and how people are being trained for this…

“It is exactly as you described it, a ramp-up at this stage, a lot of quick hiring and, you know, in-depth training and making sure we have the right people who have the right skills but then most importantly people who have the patience and the empathy to listen. They’re reaching out to people who are in crisis and some people who are in acute crisis sort of superimposed on a chronic crisis of maybe poverty or marginalization.

“And those individuals need extra time and not only need it – they deserve it. So these contact tracers are balancing the need for understanding how to do the work while also just being a gentle ear…You know, first and foremost, we’re very sensitive to a variety of populations who might not be interested in anyone who’s sort of affiliated with state government reaching out to them.

“And we’re very sensitive to that and want all those individuals to know that this is a public health activity, that their information is very safe with us and that our interest is in helping them and keeping their families and friends safe.But then the folks who we do get in touch with are actually by and large relieved, you know.

We live in a world now, in this country where to receive health care, you’ve got to go and find it. And this activity is care coming to find you. So while contact tracing is an important epidemiological tool, it’s also an act of caring. And I think by and large people are really relieved to receive that phone call.

6 minute podcast and Continue reading much more of the interview at Source: >What It Takes To Be A Contact Tracer : NPR

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4 minute podcast, some excerpt below and much more at >We Asked All 50 States About Their Contact Tracing Capacity. Here’s What We Learned :
“We are investigating the relentless math of containing the pandemic. The next phase of fighting the coronavirus leans heavily on contact tracing. And numbers will measure the result. How many people have tested positive? How many people have they recently contacted? And how quickly can those people be quarantined?

“To establish those numbers, the United States needs a very large workforce of people to do contact tracing. Are we hiring enough people? NPR’s Selena Simmons-Duffin has spent the last week putting that question to officials in every single state, along with Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. And she’s on the line. Selena, good morning.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: What’d you find?

SIMMONS-DUFFIN: So we were able to get data from 41 states. And the total they currently have added up to 7,300. Most states said they were planning a hiring surge. And after that, we will have 35,600. This is a snapshot from the past week. And a lot is in flux. But that’s our best estimate for what’s planned, more than 35,000 contact tracers nationally.

INSKEEP: Which sounds like a lot. But is that enough?

SIMMONS-DUFFIN: The short answer is not even close. Yesterday on the show, you had some influential former officials saying the country needs 180,000 total. Other estimates have put the number needed at 100,000. Here’s what Tom Frieden, former CDC director, told me about the totals we found.

TOM FRIEDEN: It’s a start. I think an increasing number of health departments around the country recognize the need to substantially scale up activities.

Call For Public Health Investment In Next Congressional COVID-19 Aid Package. The curve needs to be going down, not flat… : NPR

(If we put on flat hats, can we go out then?)

11 Minute Podcast and full story at >Call For Public Health Investment

“NPR’s Steve Inskeep talks to Scott Gottlieb, ex-head of the FDA, and Andy Slavitt, who led the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, about the letter they wrote to Congress with a plan to reopen the U.S.

What will it take for Americans to get back to work? Two veteran voices in American health care are offering answers…

“…we’re going to have to have an aggressive system in place to try to identify positive cases through testing. And when we do find people who are infected with coronavirus, we have to have a system in place to allow them to self-isolate so that they don’t continue to spread infection. That’s going to require us to hire many more public health workers to do the contact tracing, basically the blocking and tackling of public health work, where you identify people, and then you go out and talk to them and then interview people who may have been in contact with them and offer them testing.

“What we’re going to be doing as we enter into the fall, in particular, as coronavirus starts to collide with flu season and we face the risk of large outbreaks and maybe another epidemic heading into the winter, what we’re going to be trying to do is get ahead of this and put in place enough layers of protection that you mitigate spread. We’re never going to be able to reduce all spread…

“We’re at a point right now where we’re seeing cases across the country plateau, but we still have 30,000 cases a day that we’re recording. There’s many more that we’re not capturing. We’re still having 2,000 deaths a day. So we’ve plateaued, but we haven’t really seen the sustained declines that we think we need in order to really safely start to restart economic activity. In fact, really, when you look at it, only about five states have shown sustained reductions in new cases that meet the criteria set out by the administration in terms of when you would contemplate restarting activity. So the best thing we can do to get consumers back and get the economy vibrant again is give people confidence that we’ve controlled this epidemic, the virus isn’t circulating widely and people’s risk of contracting it if they go out is low again.”

 

WHO: ‘No Evidence’ COVID-19 Antibodies Stop Re-infection | Time


(Reference links in Video are accessed by clicking “Youtube” button. They will be listed under video on Youtube.)

>Access WHO report

“Catching COVID-19 once may not protect you from getting it again, according to the World Health Organization, a finding that could jeopardize efforts to allow people to return to work after recovering from the virus. “There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection,” the United Nations agency said in an April 24 statement.

“The WHO guidance came after some governments suggested that people who have antibodies to the coronavirus could be issued an “immunity passport” or “risk-free certificate” that would allow them to travel or return to work, based on the assumption that they were safe from re-infection, according to the statement. People issued such a certificate could ignore public-health guidance, increasing the risk of the disease spreading further.

“Chile was the first country to announce plans to issue immunity cards based partly on antibody tests. This has raised concerns because the tests have proven unreliable elsewhere, and some people may get deliberately ill in order to obtain the card.

“The U.S. and others have nonetheless said they’re looking into the option. While there’s a consensus that the key to ending the coronavirus pandemic is establishing co-called herd immunity, there are many unknowns. One is whether researchers can develop a safe and effective vaccine. Another is how long people who’ve recovered have immunity; reinfection after months or years is common with other human coronaviruses.

“Finally, it’s not clear what percentage of people must be immune to protect the “herd.” That depends on the contagiousness of the virus. The WHO said it’s reviewing the scientific evidence on antibody responses to coronavirus, but as yet no study has evaluated whether the presence of antibodies “confers immunity to subsequent infection by this virus in humans.” And while many countries are currently testing for antibodies, these studies aren’t designed to determine whether people recovered from the disease acquire immunity, the agency said.

Read full story at Source: >WHO: ‘No Evidence’ COVID-19 Antibodies Stop Re-infection | Time

Study confirms vitamin D protects against colds and flu (and maybe help with coronavirus respiratory infections) – Harvard Gazette 


(Click on “Youtube” for more details and reference links)

>Vitamin D protects against colds and flu, finds major global study

>Dosage of Vitamin D (Vitamin D A Rapid Review. Medscape)
2000 IU (50 mcg) per day increases vitamin D blood levels 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/L). This is my recommended dosage for Psoriasis prescribed by my dermatologist.

>Summary Vitamin D and Influenza—Prevention or Therapy? (Pubmed)

Read full story of below at Source: >Study confirms vitamin D protects against colds and flu – Harvard Gazette

“A new global collaborative study has confirmed that vitamin D supplementation can help protect against acute respiratory infections. The study, a participant data meta-analysis of 25 randomized controlled trials including more than 11,000 participants, has been published online in The BMJ.

“Most people understand that vitamin D is critical for bone and muscle health,” said Carlos Camargo of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital “Our analysis has also found that it helps the body fight acute respiratory infection, which is responsible for millions of deaths globally each year…

“Meta-analyses of these trials, which aggregate data from several studies that may have different designs or participant qualifications, also had conflicting results. To resolve these discrepancies, the research team — led by Adrian Martineau from Queen Mary University of London — conducted an individual participant data meta-analysis of trials in more than a dozen countries, including the U.S., Canada, and the U.K.

“The investigators found that daily or weekly supplementation had the greatest benefit for individuals with the most significant vitamin D deficiency (blood levels below 10 mg/dl) — cutting their risk of respiratory infection in half — and that all participants experienced some beneficial effects from regular vitamin D supplementation.

“Administering occasional high doses of vitamin D did not produce significant benefits.

 

How Antibody Tests Can Inform Public Policies To Mitigate Coronavirus Pandemic : NPR

(Video) “COVID-19 Update 54 with critical care specialist Roger Seheult, MD of https://www.MedCram.com Production of COVID-19 antibody test kits are ramping up – there are over 70 companies producing them. Antibody tests could be one of the keys to eventually easing social distancing restrictions and allowing schools and businesses to re-open. Unfortunately, only one antibody test is FDA approved at this time, and the approval of each company will take some time. Dr. Seheult illustrates how antibody tests and PCR-RT tests for COVID-19 work on the cellular level, and he discusses potential coronavirus vaccine challenges.”
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“Stanford is testing for coronavirus antibodies so they can determine who has been exposed and who could potentially go back to school or work. NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks to Dr. Jay Bhattacharya.LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO,

“HOST:The only way we’ll truly get a hold of this pandemic and come out the other side is through science – ultimately with a vaccine, but in the meantime through testing. There are tests that determine if someone who is sick has COVID-19 by taking nasal swabs, but also important is something called antibody or serological tests. And one of the places that’s doing that is Stanford University. Joining us now is Dr. Jay Bhattacharya, professor of medicine at Stanford University, who is part of this study:

Listen to 5 minute podcast and read full interview at Source: >How Antibody Tests Can Inform Public Policies To Mitigate Coronavirus Pandemic : NPR

Lessons From the 1918 Flu : NPR

“Just over a century ago, a new infectious disease overtook the globe. Its history has long been buried, subsumed beneath the story of World War I. Historian Nancy Bristow believes it’s no mistake that Americans have focused on their victory in the war rather than on the devastation of the 1918 flu pandemic.

To remember the flu (pandemic) would be to admit to the lack of control that people had had over their own health. It would be to admit that the United States was not necessarily all powerful, but was like everywhere else in the world: subject as victims to something beyond their control,” she says.

“When we exhume this history, instructive lessons for our own time emerge. As is happening now, Americans had trouble hewing to the new constraints on their social behavior.

“It was hard for people because on the one hand it’s inconvenient. And on the other, they were asking for new habits—things that they had always been allowed to do before, and suddenly you’re not allowed, for instance, to spit on the street or to share a drinking cup. That you had to cover your cough and sneeze in your elbow. These were new things people were being asked to do in 1918,” Nancy says.

“This week on Hidden Brain, Nancy guides us through the history of the epidemic, from the policies American cities imposed on their citizens, to the blues musicians who crooned, “Influenza is the kind of disease/Makes you weak down to your knees.” Bridging 1918 and 2020, we uncover the human dimensions of a pandemic.

50 Minute Podcast and Continue reading at Source: >Lessons From the 1918 Flu : NPR

Sleep and inflammation: partners in sickness and in health | Nature Reviews Immunology

VIDEO (Jump 2 minutes in for sleep and immunity): Coronavirus epidemic update 16 by pulmonologist & sleep specialist Dr. Seheult of https://www.MedCram.com.  Dr. Seheult then illustrates practical things we can do to boost our immunity / immune response to viral infections like the novel coronavirus based on peer-reviewed studies.

VIDEO (Jump 3 minutes in for sleep and immunity): Coronavirus epidemic update 17 by pulmonologist & sleep specialist Dr. Seheult of https://www.MedCram.com.  Dr. Seheult illustrates the latest coronavirus data and discusses more studies that show the connection between adequate sleep and our immunity/immune response to viral infections.

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“The discovery of reciprocal connections between the central nervous system, sleep and the immune system has shown that sleep enhances immune defences and that afferent signals from immune cells promote sleep.

“One mechanism by which sleep is proposed to provide a survival advantage is in terms of supporting a neurally integrated immune system that might anticipate injury and infectious threats.

“However, in modern times, chronic social threats can drive the development of sleep disturbances in humans, which can contribute to the dysregulation of inflammatory and antiviral responses.

“In this Review, I describe our current understanding of the relationship between sleep dynamics and host defence mechanisms, with a focus on cytokine responses, the neuroendocrine and autonomic pathways that connect sleep with the immune system and the role of inflammatory peptides in the homeostatic regulation of sleep.

“Furthermore, I discuss the therapeutic potential of harnessing these reciprocal mechanisms of sleep–immune regulation to mitigate the risk of inflammatory and infectious diseases.

Abstract from Source: >Sleep and inflammation: partners in sickness and in health | Nature Reviews Immunology

U.S. companies, labs rush to produce blood test for coronavirus immunity – Reuters


“(Reuters) – As the United States works overtime to screen thousands for the novel coronavirus, a new blood test offers the chance to find out who may have immunity – a potential game changer in the battle to contain infections and get the economy back on track. Several academic laboratories and medical companies are rushing to produce these blood tests, which can quickly identify disease-fighting antibodies in people who already have been infected but may have had mild symptoms or none at all.

“This is different from the current, sometimes hard-to-come-by diagnostic tests that draw on a nasal swab to confirm active infection. “Ultimately, this (antibody test) might help us figure out who can get the country back to normal,” Florian Krammer, a professor in vaccinology at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, told Reuters. “People who are immune could be the first people to go back to normal life and start everything up again.”

Keep reading at Source: >U.S. companies, labs rush to produce blood test for coronavirus immunity – Reuters