Tag Archives: Education

VIDEO: How To Protect Yourself From Coronavirus That Can Linger In The Air : Goats and Soda : NPR

Scientists say it’s increasingly clear that airborne virus particles help the coronavirus superspread. Here’s what they recommend to reduce the risks.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >VIDEO: How To Protect Yourself From Coronavirus That Can Linger In The Air : Goats and Soda : NPR

In some settings — especially poorly ventilated indoor rooms where many people are gathering — researchers increasingly believe that clouds of the virus expelled when someone speaks are able to stay aloft in the air and potentially infect people farther away than the recommended 6 feet of social distance.

In these settings, an infectious person shouting or laughing or coughing can release clouds containing the virus that can build up, linger and waft in the air — and then be inhaled by passersby and settle in their lungs.

You limit aerosol transmission by increasing ventilation and increasing air circulation,” says Seema Lakdawala, a flu researcher at University of Pittsburgh, which means opening the windows that surround you and putting fans in them, facing inward, to draw outside air in. That fresh air will scatter any clouds of virus that might exist. That way, you’re less likely to breathe in a big infectious dose.

When you can, move your get-together outside to a location where fresh air is all around you — a backyard, for example. Lakdawala’s neighborhood hosts happy hours, “where everybody brings a lawn chair and we sit on someone’s lawn. Everyone is spatially distanced and brings their own drink.”

Much of this is common knowledge by now, but make sure you wear your mask correctly — making sure that it fits snugly over your nose and mouth while not obstructing your ability to breathe — and that you keep a personal space bubble of at least 6 feet between you and other people.

The mask will catch a lot of the droplets that come out when you speak or laugh or cough — and also block some of other people’s droplets from getting into your nose and mouth.

Continue with full story at source link above.

Why Children Should Wear Face Masks | Duke Health

CDC guidance does NOT imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months. All channels of today’s news snap judged the CDC guidance comments.

What??? I turned on the TV news this morning and they were all happy to state new reports from the CDC that we get 3 months free ride from coronavirus after quarantine!

“The CDC clarified on Friday that people who are infected with the coronavirus are not immune to reinfection in the following three months.

Full story of excerpts below at Source: >CDC guidance does not imply immunity to coronavirus for 3 months

  • “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clarified on Friday that its updated quarantine guidance does not imply people who are infected with the coronavirus are immune to reinfection.
  • It was reported in the news about CDC guidelines on quarantining, updated on Aug. 3, (seemed to) indicate that people who were once infected with the coronavirus are protected from reinfection for at least three months afterward.
  • The agency said it simply suggests retesting someone in the following three months after their initial infection is unnecessary unless that person shows symptoms that can’t be associated with another illness.

“Contrary to media reporting today, this science does not imply a person is immune to reinfection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the 3 months following infection,” the CDC said in a statement.

I think this shows how easy it is for the public (and pundits) who do not carefully, logically approach science and data continually misinterpret the facts.

Continue with full story at source link above.

 

That's My Story & I'm Sticking To It – Usefully Useless Information

 

 

For Medicare, Having A Power Of Attorney Is Not Enough

A power of attorney is a powerful thing, but when it comes to Medicare it’s not enough.

>Medicare Power of Attorney 101

Read full story of excerpts at Source: >For Medicare, Having A Power Of Attorney Is Not Enough

“A power of attorney (POA) is a powerful thing. A financial power of attorney document allows an appointed person to make financial, legal and property decisions on another individual’s behalf. A person holding another’s POA can sell the individual’s car to pay medical bills, for example. A medical POA is a durable power of attorney for healthcare. This allows an agent (a trusted friend or family member) to make important and necessary healthcare decisions if the individual becomes incapacitated or unable to communicate or participate in care. For example, with this authority, the POA can make healthcare decisions for an individual on a ventilator. Establishing powers of attorney (POA) must be done while a person is of sound mind and able to make financial and medical decisions.

The problem was that powers of attorney do not stand alone when it comes to Medicare issues. By law, Medicare requires a beneficiary’s written permission to use or provide personal medical information for any purpose not defined in the privacy notice contained in the “Medicare & You” handbook.

Note these specific instructions for completion of the form.

  • Check whether you authorize Medicare to release limited or any information. If limited, identify the type of information, such as claims, eligibility or premiums.
  • Identify whether the authorization applies for a specified period of time or indefinitely.
  • Submit the form by mail to Medicare. There is no fax or email submission.

You never know what’s around the corner so the time to prepare is before you get there. Take these three important steps.

  • Establish or update your financial and medical powers-of-attorney.
  • Identify and designate your authorized Medicare representative.
  • Contact your Medicare plan(s) and complete the authorization forms.

Continue with more at source link above.

Your Guardian #Angels stand ready to catch you - Ask An Angel ...

Face Shields and Coronavirus Spread 

“While surgical and cloth face masks have been the standard choice amid the pandemic thus far, plastic face shields have started to rise in popularity.

Full Story of excerpts below at Source: >Are Face Shields or Face Masks More Effective at Preventing Coronavirus Spread? | PEOPLE.com

“When asked whether they work as well as more traditional face masks, Dr. David Edwards of Harvard University tells PEOPLE that there are “pros and cons” to the plastic coverings. Although they’re “particularly effective” at preventing large airborne respiratory droplets — which could result from a person nearby coughing or sneezing — they don’t do as good of a job with blocking smaller particles, as face shields don’t completely seal off the face. With smaller particles, they don’t travel like bullets, they hover in the air and below that face shield you’re still breathing in that air,” Edwards says.

“However, while face shields can be helpful, and certainly won’t hurt individuals who choose to use them, Edwards still recommends wearing masks — either alone, or in conjunction with the plastic coverings.

Continue full story at source link above.

>Popular Face Shield on Amazon

ArtToFrames SH-G-CLEAR-2-2 Clear This is a face Shield, 2 Pack, 2 Count

 

 

The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers – NPR

>Factcheck – A Guide to Our Coronavirus Coverage

>Guide to Online Health Information 16 minute learning activity

>Snopes Factchecking Medical Section

>Newsguard COVID-19 Misinformation Resources

>Health Feedback Scientists Sorting Fact from Fiction

>Patient Advisor posts tag: Misinformation

“The coronavirus pandemic has posed a special challenge for scientists: Figuring out how to make sense of a flood of scientific papers from labs and scientists unfamiliar to them.

Read full story at source: >The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

“More than 6,000 coronavirus-related preprints from researchers around the world have been posted since the pandemic began, without the usual peer review as a quality check. Some are poor quality, while others, including papers from China from early in the course of the epidemic, contain vital information.

It takes a large investment of attention and effort to really dig deeply into a manuscript to scrutinize the methods, the claims and the relationship between the methods and the claims

“In the case of the hydroxychloroquine study… the reported results had veered significantly from their previously stated experimental plan. “Those struck me as a lot of major red flags…It probably took me something between 15 minutes and 30 minutes to come to the conclusion that this paper wasn’t worth the time of day. Sure enough, the promise of hydroxychloroquine as a COVID-19 treatment eventually crumbled, as several larger studies failed to show any benefit.

One way researchers are working to overcome bias is by coming together to form international research teams... Motivated by a desire to address “a common threat to humanity”

Read full story at source link above.

Coronavirus can float in air — and experts say WHO and CDC should tell people that | KTLA

>NPR 10 minute podcast: Scientists Debate How Coronavirus Spreads, Experts Push For Mask Mandate

>The Scientists Debate: Is COVID-19 transmitted by airborne aerosols?

>Major News Outlets: Is COVID Airborne? 239 Scientists Say Evidence Shows It Is, Urge WHO, CDC To Alter Recommendations

“Most public health organizations, including the World Health Organization, do not recognize airborne transmission except for aerosol-generating procedures performed in healthcare settings. Hand washing and social distancing are appropriate, but in our view, insufficient to provide protection from virus-carrying respiratory microdroplets released into the air by infected people,”

‘They don’t want to talk about airborne transmission because that is going to make people afraid’

Read full story at Source: >Coronavirus can float in air — and experts say WHO and CDC should tell people that | KTLA

“Studies by the signatories and other scientists have demonstrated beyond any reasonable doubt that viruses are released during exhalation, talking, and coughing in microdroplets small enough to remain aloft in air and pose a risk of exposure at distances beyond 1 to 2 meters (yards) from an infected individual,”

“For example, at typical indoor air velocities, a 5 nanometre droplet will travel tens of meters, much greater than the scale of a typical room, while settling from a height of 1.5 metres (about five feet) to the floor.” What’s not clearly understood is how important droplet size is to coronavirus transmission,

“A lot of people crowded close together indoors where it is poorly ventilated — that is what drives the pandemic,” … A loud bar, where people must raise their voices to be heard, is a perfect storm of close contact, poor air circulation and people generating a lot of virus-carrying particles by talking, laughing and shouting.

Advice to avoid coronavirus transmission:

“I am very much concerned about the general public and schools and ventilation in school buildings and in dorms on college campuses and in bars and in churches and where people sing and where people congregate,” 

• Provide sufficient and effective ventilation (supply clean outdoor air, minimize recirculating air) particularly in public buildings, workplace environments, schools, hospitals and age care homes.

• Supplement general ventilation with airborne infection controls such as local exhaust, high efficiency air filtration, and germicidal ultraviolet lights. (These would be placed high up in the ceiling to avoid damage to people’s eyes and skin)

• Avoid overcrowding, particularly in public transport and public buildings.

“Such measures are practical and often can be easily implemented; many are not costly, For example, simple steps such as opening both doors and windows can dramatically increase air flow rates in many buildings…In buildings, carbon dioxide monitors can help managers know if the air is being refreshed properly.

“In a car, open windows and make sure the air conditioning or heat is not recirculated but set to include outside air.

Continue reading full story at source link above.

A User’s Guide To Masks: What Types Offer The Best Protection? : Goats and Soda : NPR

They’re made of cotton. Or polyester. Or paper. Or polypropylene. Here’s what researchers say about the effectiveness of the different types of face masks during this pandemic.

>Widespread Use Of Face Masks Could Save Tens Of Thousands Of Lives, Models Project

>Fabric Masks Need 3 Specific Layers to Effectively Block Coronavirus, WHO Says

>Visualization shows exactly how face masks stop COVID-19 transmission

Read full story at source: >A User’s Guide To Masks: What Types Offer The Best Protection? : Goats and Soda : NPR

“Face masks can also offer the wearer some protection — though how much varies greatly, depending on the type of mask. No mask will offer full protection, and they should not be viewed as a replacement for physical distancing of at least 6 feet from others, frequent hand-washing and avoiding crowds. When you combine masks with those measures, they can make a big difference.

“…consider the fabric itself. The tightness of the weave is really important. … To check your fabric, hold it up to a light: If you can easily see the outline of the individual fibers, it’s not going to make a great filter. Researchers say a thick 100% cotton weave is a good bet. That’s because at the microscopic level, the natural fibers in cotton tend to have more three-dimensional structure than synthetic fibers, which are smoother…That 3D structure can create more roadblocks that can stop an incoming particle

“Think multiple layers. Several studies have found that masks made of multiple layers are more effective at blocking small particles. A good option: a mask made of two layers of a thick-weave fabric with a built-in pocket where you can place a filter...The best bet for the material to slip in as a filter is polypropylene, which is derived from plastic.. “If you go to Walmart, you look for Oly-fun, which is the brand name of that fabric. It’s also called spunbond

“polypropylene is great as a physical filter but has another benefit: It holds an electrostatic charge. In other words, it uses the power of static electricity. Think of the static cling that can happen when you rub two pieces of fabric together, …That’s basically what’s happening with this fabric: That “cling” effect traps incoming — and outgoing — droplets. “That’s what you want — the cling is what’s important…And unlike other materials, polypropylene keeps its electrostatic charge in the humidity created when you breathe out

“Avoid masks with exhalation valves. Some cloth and disposable masks come with an exhalation valve at the front. The valve makes it easier to breathe out, but it also releases unfiltered air, so it doesn’t protect others if you’re contagious. And protecting others is the primary reason to wear a mask.

Continue reading much more of full story at link above.

 

Do probiotics actually do anything? – 60 Minutes – CBS News

microbiomesnapshot0.jpg

Probiotics, manufactured mixtures of “good bacteria” that help digest food, have become a growing multibillion-dollar industry. But do they work?

13 Minute newscast and Full story at Source: >Do probiotics actually do anything? – 60 Minutes – CBS News

“There is an invisible universe hidden inside your body, it’s called the gut microbiome — a vast array of trillions of intestinal bacteria, hundreds of different species. They help digest your food in exchange for a warm, safe place to live. And we are only now starting to discover the gut microbiome plays a much larger role in our lives than we ever imagined.

“Some of those bacteria found inside us are replicated in commercially manufactured mixtures called “probiotics.” You see them on grocery and pharmacy shelves, and they’re recommended by your friends and often, by doctors like me.

“But do probiotics actually do anything?  To find out, first you need to know about the gut microbiome. (Continue at video and source link above)

“Right now, the microbiome is an area of hot research. Doctors are already treating illness by manipulating gut bacteria. A potentially life-threatening infection of the colon called C. Diff. has been successfully treated by moving bacteria from the gut of a healthy person to the gut of somebody who’s sick.

“And millions of people are trying to improve their microbiomes themselves using probiotics, so-called “good bacteria.” But here’s the problem: there’s a lot of conflict among scientists about whether probiotics provide any benefit at all.

“Dr. Hibberd has reviewed hundreds of studies in the medical literature about probiotics. She has also done her own studies and told us there’s not enough high quality research to recommend off-the-shelf probiotics for the medical problems for which they’re commonly used. 

Dr. Patricia Hibberd: The whole idea that maybe throwing in good bacteria that we would take by mouth that hopefully would land in the right places in the GI tract and work with the immune system. We just don’t know how to do any of that.

“Restoring that balance of bacteria in the gut microbiome is just one goal touted by makers of probiotics, a $50 billion global industry sold to us in capsules, popsicles, cereal, tea and some yogurt. And we’re told probiotics can even help your dog.

“One cause of confusion may be the placebo effect: some people using probiotics may feel better because they expect to feel better. And figuring out what probiotics do inside the gut is complicated. One reason is that each person’s microbiome is unique, so the same probiotic may have different effects on different people

“The researchers collected thousands of samples from a small group of adult volunteers who were given probiotics. Eran Segal: We’ve actually looked across the entire gastrointestinal tract at places where nobody has looked before. The volunteers all underwent multiple endoscopies and colonoscopies. ..so the results were actually very striking so what we’re seeing is that half the people take the probiotics and the probiotics, as they go in, they just go out and they don’t populate the gut.

“The researchers also studied a treatment commonly recommended by doctors, giving probiotics to help restore the balance of gut bacteria wiped out by antibiotics. Eran Segal: We found that the probiotics actually delayed the restoration of the bacteria of those individuals to what they had before as compared to individuals who took antibiotics and then did nothing.

“Despite disagreement about how or whether today’s probiotics work, every scientist we spoke with was hopeful about the possibility of improving health by manipulating the microbiome. Last year, Dr. Gordon’s team reported that a special supplemental mixture of nutrients containing chickpeas, soy, bananas and peanuts can repair the damaged microbiome of malnourished infants.

(See much more of full story and video at source link above)

A Nation Of Magical Thinkers | Blog For Iowa

I first heard the term “magical thinking” on ‘What you need to know” ABC news daily series yesterday from Dr. Jenifer Ashton. The term is a medical term in psychology to describe illogical thought patterns which ignores new evidence that challenges current non-scientific theories that are really beliefs. — DH

Full story at Source: >A Nation Of Magical Thinkers | Blog For Iowa

“COVID-19 has revealed our societal failure to understand what evidence is and to respect how it works. National and local political leaders have made decisions that ignored the evidence. Members of the general public have proved slow to accept the evidence. Measures adopted to help flatten the curve have been met with virulent protests, despite the evidence that they are working.”

“We have become a nation of magical thinkers, making decisions based on what we hope is the case and whom we want to believe.  When confronted with opposing evidence, we do not engage with it. We dismiss it and stick a label on it: “fake,” “phony,” “biased,” etc. And then we mistake that label for evidence.”

 

COVID-19 Contact Tracing | CDC

>After COVID-19 Contact Tracing Comes Quarantine. Here’s How That Works : Shots – Health News : NPR

Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps keep you, your family, and your community safe.

Full CDC site on contact tracing at Source: >COVID-19 Contact Tracing | CDC

“Contact tracing is used by health departments to prevent the spread of infectious disease. In general, contact tracing involves identifying people who have an infectious disease (cases) and people who they came in contact with (contacts) and working with them to interrupt disease spread. This includes asking people with COVID-19 to >isolate and their contacts to >quarantine at home voluntarily.

“To prevent the further spread of disease, people who had contact with someone with COVID-19 are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others until 14 days after their last exposure to a person with COVID-19. Contacts should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for symptoms of COVID-19.

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may call you to check-in on your health, discuss who you’ve been in contact with, and ask where you spent time while you may have been infectious and able to spread COVID-19 to others. You will also be asked to stay at home and >self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

Continue at CDC source link above for full details.

Parties — Not Protests — Are Causing Spikes In Coronavirus : Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

Erika Lautenbach, director of the Whatcom County Health Department in Washington state, says protests against police violence aren’t among the catalysts for the spread of COVID-19.

4 Minute podcast and full story at Source: >Parties — Not Protests — Are Causing Spikes In Coronavirus : Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

As the U.S. begins to open back up, coronavirus clusters — where multiple people contract COVID-19 at the same event or location are popping up all over the country. And despite drawing massive crowds, protests against police violence and racial injustice in Washington state weren’t among those clusters.

“We did have a rally in Bellingham, which is our county seat, and there was also a protest, and we have not been able to connect a single case to that rally or to the protest, and what we’re finding is in large part that’s due to the use of masks

14 cases were associated with a party of 100 to 150 people in early June. Subsequently, 15 more cases were associated with the original 14. So that one event spread to 29 people and 31 related employers,

“We’re finding that the social events and gatherings, these parties where people aren’t wearing masks, are our primary source of infection, …And then the secondary source of infection is workplace settings

“The concern is that because these younger people are having more mild symptoms, they are going to work sick, they are visiting with their parents and grandparents sick and they’re continuing to go to social events where they expose more and more people

Coronavirus Resource Center – Harvard Health

Harvard Health Publishing Logo

As coronavirus spreads, many questions and some answers

See full site of excerpts below and all resources at Source: >Coronavirus Resource Center – Harvard Health

“The rapid spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 has sparked alarm worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared this rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, and countries around the world are grappling with a surge in confirmed cases. In the US, social distancing to slow the spread of coronavirus has created a new normal. Meanwhile, scientists are exploring potential treatments and are beginning clinical trials to test new therapies and vaccines. And hospitals are ramping up their capabilities to care for increasing numbers of infected patients.

(At the source above), “you’ll find answers to common questions all of us are asking. We will be adding new questions and updating answers as reliable information becomes available. Also see our podcasts featuring experts discussing coronavirus and COVID-19.

COVID-19 Is Likely Airborne, Aerosol Scientist Says


Something has been bothering Kimberly Prather, PhD: everything she reads about COVID-19 points to a pathogen that travels through the air.

>Reducing transmission of Coronavirus, AAAS Science
(Sars-CoV-2 is the latest Coronavirus)

Full story of excerpts below on Medscape at Source: >COVID-19 Is Likely Airborne, Aerosol Scientist Says

A lot of the evidence has been pointing to aerosol transmission of respiratory viruses,”  Influenza can be passed through the air, as can the virus that causes SARS. “This particular virus, a lot of evidence is mounting. ..she’s been alarmed not to see the CDC or WHO come out with a strong statement that people could catch COVID-19 by breathing it in.

“…masks can play a major role in stopping that transmission. When you sing, the amount of droplets and aerosol that come out is really, in some respects, scary…When a person coughs or sneezes, they generate large droplets laden with viral particles. Those droplets are heavy and fall to the ground or a nearby surface pretty quickly, within seconds. They are still somewhat wet and sticky when they land.

“That’s where the 6-foot rule comes in… It’s based on studies of respiratory droplets conducted in the 1930s. Aerosols…can accumulate, remain infectious in indoor air for hours, and be easily inhaled deeply into the lungs this is a scary thing to be telling people. “I hesitate. I don’t want to freak people out.” She also believes knowledge is power.

“I have to say something because this could actually protect people,” she says. What airborne transmission means, she says, is that 6 feet is not far enough to stand apart. It also means we should probably be wearing masks a lot more often.

What It Takes To Be A Contact Tracer : NPR Do you have empathy? Welcome to the new economy


Riding the Tidal Wave of the Coming Public Health Economy

5 min podcast >A Day In The Life Of A Coronavirus Contact Tracer

Are the US and state governments being dragged kicking and screaming into an unprecedented massive investment for contact tracing? As governments extol the quick recovery from the virus pandemic, experts keep talking of repeating infection waves since our fragmented bureaucracy cannot get a handle what the virus is really doing in this country until massive resources are committed to tracking it down. Fighting over costs will be swept away into absolute submission and a new economy. Other countries and a few States are leading the way. Watch for new remote and compassionate footwork jobs to start appearing. Contract tracing needs empathy. Everyone is frightened when contacted. — DH

“NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with John Welch, the director of partnerships & operations for Massachusetts’ COVID-19 response at Partners In Health, about their contact tracing program and training.

“Public health experts say that one of the keys to safely lifting stay-at-home orders around the country is contact tracing. So we wanted to spend some time now learning more about what it takes to implement a statewide contact tracing program and how people are being trained for this…

“It is exactly as you described it, a ramp-up at this stage, a lot of quick hiring and, you know, in-depth training and making sure we have the right people who have the right skills but then most importantly people who have the patience and the empathy to listen. They’re reaching out to people who are in crisis and some people who are in acute crisis sort of superimposed on a chronic crisis of maybe poverty or marginalization.

“And those individuals need extra time and not only need it – they deserve it. So these contact tracers are balancing the need for understanding how to do the work while also just being a gentle ear…You know, first and foremost, we’re very sensitive to a variety of populations who might not be interested in anyone who’s sort of affiliated with state government reaching out to them.

“And we’re very sensitive to that and want all those individuals to know that this is a public health activity, that their information is very safe with us and that our interest is in helping them and keeping their families and friends safe.But then the folks who we do get in touch with are actually by and large relieved, you know.

We live in a world now, in this country where to receive health care, you’ve got to go and find it. And this activity is care coming to find you. So while contact tracing is an important epidemiological tool, it’s also an act of caring. And I think by and large people are really relieved to receive that phone call.

6 minute podcast and Continue reading much more of the interview at Source: >What It Takes To Be A Contact Tracer : NPR

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4 minute podcast, some excerpt below and much more at >We Asked All 50 States About Their Contact Tracing Capacity. Here’s What We Learned :
“We are investigating the relentless math of containing the pandemic. The next phase of fighting the coronavirus leans heavily on contact tracing. And numbers will measure the result. How many people have tested positive? How many people have they recently contacted? And how quickly can those people be quarantined?

“To establish those numbers, the United States needs a very large workforce of people to do contact tracing. Are we hiring enough people? NPR’s Selena Simmons-Duffin has spent the last week putting that question to officials in every single state, along with Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. And she’s on the line. Selena, good morning.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: What’d you find?

SIMMONS-DUFFIN: So we were able to get data from 41 states. And the total they currently have added up to 7,300. Most states said they were planning a hiring surge. And after that, we will have 35,600. This is a snapshot from the past week. And a lot is in flux. But that’s our best estimate for what’s planned, more than 35,000 contact tracers nationally.

INSKEEP: Which sounds like a lot. But is that enough?

SIMMONS-DUFFIN: The short answer is not even close. Yesterday on the show, you had some influential former officials saying the country needs 180,000 total. Other estimates have put the number needed at 100,000. Here’s what Tom Frieden, former CDC director, told me about the totals we found.

TOM FRIEDEN: It’s a start. I think an increasing number of health departments around the country recognize the need to substantially scale up activities.

Read Aloud Movement Revival – A Whole Brain process for locked up families and volunteers to read to all generations

Can there be anything that is comprehensive enough to address a whole range of lockup syndromes of our current lives? Meet the “Read Aloud Movement” started by one man in 1979 with his first edition of the book >Jim Trelease’s Read-Aloud Handbook: Eighth Edition Revised Edition

I have not had a chance to explore the resources to look for read aloud opportunities but I would welcome anyone to join with me to create a zoom-like group for reading to kids – like group readings. Rehearsals would be great fun!


Read how a passion for helping others in need turned into a worldwide movement: (Read Aloud Resources see below)

From the source >Jim Trelease’s Bio Page :

“While working for a Massachusetts daily newspaper (the Springfield Daily News, now the Springfield Republican) as an artist and writer, he began weekly volunteer visits to community classrooms, talking with children about journalism and art as careers. At the same time, he and his wife Susan were raising their two children (Elizabeth and Jamie). A daily ritual for Jim was reading aloud to his children, largely at that point because his father had read to him…Soon, however, the nightly ritual would coincide with one of his classroom observations.

“Most of the students he visited (about 40 schools a year) didn’t read very much for pleasure, but the ones who did nearly always came from classrooms where the teachers read aloud daily and incorporated sustained silent reading into the daily routine. ..Thinking there might be a connection between being read to and how much the child wanted to read, Jim investigated to see if any research was available on the subject. Sure enough, there was lots of it— but nearly always published in education journals or written in academic language that would be foreign to the average parent or teacher.

“The dearth of accessible material inspired him to write and self-publish the first edition of The Read-Aloud Handbook in 1979. “I self-published because I never thought any of the major publishers would be interested in it. At that point, ‘reading aloud’ was too simple and not painful enough to do the child any good. At least, that’s what many educators thought,” he says in hindsight. But that mindset would soon change.

“Discovered accidentally by a then-fledgling literary agent named Raphael Sagalyn, the book came to the attention of Penguin USA after six other publishers turned it down. In 1982, they published an expanded edition. Touted by “Dear Abby” in February of 1983, it spent 17 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

“By 1985, the U.S. Department of Education’s Commission on Reading was calling “reading aloud to children” the single most important activity one could do to raise a reader.

“The first Penguin edition of the Handbook was followed by six more U.S. editions, along with British, Australian, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, and Indonesian versions. It was the inspiration for PBS’s “Storytime” series, and is now the all-time bestselling guide to children’s literature for parents and teachers — nearly 2 million copies sold to date world-wide.

img=cover of The Read-Aloud HandbookThe Handbook is now used as a text for future teachers at more than 60 colleges and universities. ..Featured on “The Larry King Show,” profiled in Smithsonian (Feb. ’95), Reader’s Digest (July ’95), and U.S. News & World Report (Mar. 17, 1986), Trelease was one of the U.S.’s most sought-after education speakers, addressing parents, teachers, and librarians on the subjects of children, literature, and television. He presented in all 50 states and was a frequent keynoter for national education conferences. His final year of public lectures and seminars was 2008 but he continues to maintain his Web site with reviews of new children’s books.

“Between 1979 and 2008, Trelease’s work was a pivotal force for numerous read-aloud movements in both the U.S. and abroad. Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, Nebraska, and Hawaii launched state-wide campaigns based on Jim’s book and seminars, as did one European country. (read the full web page at the source link above)
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Below is a list of links on the read aloud movement from Jim Trelease’s website on the book and on the internet. I highly recommend personal exploration of these resources for reading aloud activities for all of your family, any age, and for volunteers to find read aloud opportunities online.

>Jim Trelease’s Read-Aloud Handbook FAQs and read much of the book online.

>Jim Trelease The Read Aloud Handbook (Wikipedia)

>The Read-Aloud Family: Making Meaningful and Lasting Connections with Your Kids

>Read-Aloud Books: The Best Websites for Kids

 >Read Aloud Resources

>StoryMarch

>BookSpring Recommends Online Learning Resources

>Facebook Stuck Inside: Author’s Virtual Book Club

>Facebook read aloud to children group events

>Facebook read aloud volunteer children

>Book Club Organizations (Wikipedia)

>Bookspring recommendations for locked in families

A toolkit for spotting fake news – Simon Black – Medium

Fake News can kill. Ignore this information at your peril.

In this post I am including all the useful resources I can find on combating fake news on the internet including plugins and browser extensions and recent developments. The last toolkit source below even though it was in 2019 seemed to describe all the best tools. Above the source below is a list of links and info of recent developments on fake news:

>Fake News About Coronavirus Is Spreading. We Need A Vaccine Against Misinformation: Goats and Soda : NPR

>Did You Fall For A Coronavirus Hoax? Facebook Will Let You Know

>Combating Fake News

“Since people consume online news via a browser, browser extensions (and app-based services) have become more popular.  These include:

“– Our.News.  This service uses a combination of objective facts (about an article) with subjective views that incorporate user ratings to create labels (like nutrition labels on food) next to new articles that a reader can use to make a judgement.  Our.News labels use publisher descriptions from Freedom Forum, bias ratings from AllSides, information about an article’s sources author and editor.  It also uses fact-checking information from sources including PolitiFact, Snopes and FactCheck.org, and labels such as “clickbait” or “satire” along with and user ratings and reviews.  The Our.News browser extension is available for Firefox and Chrome, and there is an iOS app. For more information go to https://our.news/.

“– NewsGuard. This service, for personal use or for NewsGuard’s library and school system partners, offers a reliability rating score of 0-100 for each site based on its performance on nine key criteria, ratings icons (green-red ratings) next to links on all of the top search engines, social media platforms, and news aggregation websites.  Also, NewsGuard gives summaries showing who owns each site, its political leaning (if any), as well as warnings about hoaxes, political propaganda, conspiracy theories, advertising influences and more.  For more information, go to https://www.newsguardtech.com/.

>Use this Chrome extension TrustedNews to know if you’re reading fake or biased news

>NewsGuard drops its paywall to combat coronavirus misinformation

>Fake News: Discerning Fake News

>List of fake news websites

>Fake news (Wikipedia)


Read full details of quote below at Source: >A toolkit for spotting fake news – Simon Black – Medium

“The idea of fake news is not new. People have been manipulating facts, creating false narratives, and outright lying for as long as they have been communicating.That being said one thing to come out of the American presidential election in 2016 was the idea of fake news being pressed firmly into the mainstream consciousness.

“While it has been used as a tool by precisely those who seek to lie to the public it is nevertheless a timely reminder that new communication technologies have created a surge in fake news for two reasons; They allow new ways for manipulated stories to be produced, distributed, and consumed.

“At the same time the shift away from a subscription model of journalism to one driven by page views and streams has taken us back to the days of the “yellow press”. Digital news producers are standing on the figurative street corners of Google, Facebook, and other such sites and trying to grab as much traffic as possible from the stream of people flowing by.

“While this technological disruption has changed things and allowed fake news to spread it has also provided powerful tools for spotting, and sorting news. I’ve started this page as a place to gather the different types of sites that are available online. These are divided into the following categories;Fact checking sites, Lobbyist and donation tracking sites, Plugins, browser extensions, and apps.

(Continue reading full details at source above.)

 

Lessons From the 1918 Flu : NPR

“Just over a century ago, a new infectious disease overtook the globe. Its history has long been buried, subsumed beneath the story of World War I. Historian Nancy Bristow believes it’s no mistake that Americans have focused on their victory in the war rather than on the devastation of the 1918 flu pandemic.

To remember the flu (pandemic) would be to admit to the lack of control that people had had over their own health. It would be to admit that the United States was not necessarily all powerful, but was like everywhere else in the world: subject as victims to something beyond their control,” she says.

“When we exhume this history, instructive lessons for our own time emerge. As is happening now, Americans had trouble hewing to the new constraints on their social behavior.

“It was hard for people because on the one hand it’s inconvenient. And on the other, they were asking for new habits—things that they had always been allowed to do before, and suddenly you’re not allowed, for instance, to spit on the street or to share a drinking cup. That you had to cover your cough and sneeze in your elbow. These were new things people were being asked to do in 1918,” Nancy says.

“This week on Hidden Brain, Nancy guides us through the history of the epidemic, from the policies American cities imposed on their citizens, to the blues musicians who crooned, “Influenza is the kind of disease/Makes you weak down to your knees.” Bridging 1918 and 2020, we uncover the human dimensions of a pandemic.

50 Minute Podcast and Continue reading at Source: >Lessons From the 1918 Flu : NPR

Coronavirus symptoms: Think you have COVID-19? Here’s what to do – CBS News

>Almost half of coronavirus patients have digestive symptoms, study finds

“The first thing to do is match your symptoms to those experienced by COVID-19 patients“,… Fever, a dry cough, and shortness of breath are the three most common symptoms … Headaches, body aches, sore throat and fatigue sometimes occur but are more often associated with the flu … A runny nose rarely occurs with COVID-19, and sneezing is not a symptom of the virus.

“Next, assess the severity of your symptoms. Don’t just rush to the hospital. If you can still breathe reasonably well or your fever responds to over-the-counter remedies like acetaminophen (Tylenol), you should call your family doctor to discuss your best options for care,

“If your symptoms are mild, you can reach out to your primary care physician, and if you feel like you can manage at home, folks are advised to self-quarantine. “Don’t just head to your doctor’s office before calling first. Set up an appointment so they can meet you in the parking lot, give you a face mask, and bring you into the office by a route that will expose the fewest people to illness

.”The official suggestion is that face masks don’t protect you from others,” … “They protect others from you. “If possible, your doctor will test you for the coronavirus. …People who don’t have a primary care doctor should reach out to their local health department for guidance on their symptoms and testing … Local public health officials also should be able to tell you about other options for testing in your area.

“The current turnaround time for a COVID-19 test is two days …At this point, people who don’t have symptoms are not being tested …People who are sick enough to need to go to the hospital — for example, they cannot readily draw breath or feel like they are going to pass out — should either call 911 or visit their closest emergency department …

“Those in high-risk groups — seniors and people with compromised immune systems — also should consider heading to the emergency department, …

“People who are sick at home should monitor their symptoms, get rest and stay hydrated, …The best way to fight coronavirus is to never get infected in the first place. According to experts, that’s best done by frequent hand washing, avoiding people who are sick, and “social distancing,” or avoiding large groups.

Read more at Source: >Coronavirus symptoms: Think you have COVID-19? Here’s what to do – CBS News

Coronavirus symptoms of COVID-19

Google launches COVID-19 page and search portal with safety tips, official stats and more, US-only for now | TechCrunch

(Google) “the company launched a new information portal dedicated to the pandemic as well as an improved search experience for desktop and mobile. The search experience, Google says, was updated in response to “people’s information needs expanding,” while the new information portal also provides the basic, most useful information (for example around symptoms), plus a lot of links and on-site options to explore further.

>Google’s New Site: Coronavirus disease (COVID‑19)

“The new search experience now not only includes search results but also a number of additional links to “authoritative information” from health authorities and updated data and visualisations.“ This new format organizes the search results page to help people easily navigate information and resources, and it will also make it possible to add more information over time as it becomes available,”

“The search experience now also includes links to a Twitter carousel featuring accounts from civic organizations local to you, and also a new “most common questions” section related to the pandemic from the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“the portal … features tips on staying healthy and advice for those who are concerned; links to further official resources; links to more localised resources; links to fundraising efforts; the latest statistics; and an overview of all of Google’s own work (for example, the specific efforts it’s making for educators).

“And the internet is the main place people will turn in the days and weeks ahead as they are asked to socially isolate themselves to slow down the spread of the pandemic, serving its role in providing information, but hopefully also some diversion and enrichment. Google’s site is bringing together as many of the positive and legitimate strands of information as it can.

“The main page focuses on the most important basics: an brief overview of the virus, a list of the most common symptoms, a list of most common things you can do to prevent getting infected or spreading the infection and a (very brief, for now) section on treatments. From this, it goes on to more detailed links to videos and other resources for specific interests such as advice for the elderly, a map-based data overview to monitor what is going on elsewhere; and then resources for further help for topics that are coming up a lot, such as advice for people working from home, or for how to set up self-isolation, online education advice, cooking resources and more.

Read more at Source: >Google launches COVID-19 page and search portal with safety tips, official stats and more, US-only for now | TechCrunch

 

Fake News About Coronavirus Is Spreading. We Need A Vaccine Against Misinformation: Goats and Soda : NPR

Fake Facts Are Flying About Coronavirus. Now There’s A Plan To Debunk Them

>(4 min podcast) Misinformation Around The Coronavirus

>(4 min podcast) COVID-19 Myths Debunked
>Dr. Seema Yasmin
is here to debunk some of these bogus claims. She’s a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University and author of the forthcoming book “Debunked.”

>Mythbusters (WHO)

>Videos: Advice for the public

>What really works to keep coronavirus away? 4 questions answered by a public health professional

>Coronavirus: it’s time to debunk claims that vitamin C could cure it

“The coronavirus outbreak has sparked what the World Health Organization is calling an “infodemic” — an overwhelming amount of information on social media and websites. Some of it’s accurate. And some is downright untrue.The false statements range from a conspiracy theory that the virus is a man-made bioweapon to the claim that more than 100,000 have died from the disease (as of this week, there are more than 3800 reported fatalities world wide).

“WHO is fighting back. In early January, a few weeks after China reported the first cases, the U.N. agency launched a pilot program to make sure the facts about the newly identified virus are communicated to the public. The project is called EPI-WIN — short for WHO Information Network for Epidemics.”

We need a vaccine against misinformation,” said Dr. Mike Ryan, head of WHO’s health emergencies program, at a WHO briefing on the virus in February.”

(3 minute podcast) Continue reading at Source: >Fake News About Coronavirus Is Spreading: ‘We Need A Vaccine Against Misinformation’ : Goats and Soda : NPR

How to boost your immune system – Harvard Health

Also see: >9 Natural Ways To Boost Your Immune System

“Helpful ways to strengthen your immune system and fight off disease

“On the whole, your immune system does a remarkable job of defending you against disease-causing microorganisms. But sometimes it fails: A germ invades successfully and makes you sick. Is it possible to intervene in this process and boost your immune system?

“What if you improve your diet? Take certain vitamins or herbal preparations? Make other lifestyle changes in the hope of producing a near-perfect immune response? What can you do to boost your immune system?

“There is still much that researchers don’t know about the intricacies and interconnectedness of the immune response. For now, there are no scientifically proven direct links between lifestyle and enhanced immune function.

But that doesn’t mean the effects of lifestyle on the immune system aren’t intriguing and shouldn’t be studied. Researchers are exploring the effects of diet, exercise, age, psychological stress, and other factors on the immune response, both in animals and in humans.

In the meantime, general healthy-living strategies are a good way to start giving your immune system the upper hand.

Continue reading at Source: >How to boost your immune system – Harvard Health

A Google For Scientific Articles, For The Next Time You’re Locked In A Debate About Vaccines | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

Arguing about scientific topics is always a fraught endeavor. Part of the problem—whether you’re discussing GMOs, the measles vaccine, or some other controversial topic—is that finding relevant research isn’t easy for people who don’t spend their days poring through scientific journals.

Search for “measles vaccine” on Google, for example, and you’ll get the standard CDC information along with a series of news articles about the recent Disneyland measles outbreak and the autism/measles vaccine myth. Good luck finding any real research.

Sparrho is like the Google for scientific papers—and patents, posters, events, and grants. Just type in keywords, like “GMO food,” and you’ll soon have access to all the latest research. Here’s a snapshot of what comes up when you search for GMO food:

As you can see, the latest results are up-to-date (I performed the search on March 6). Some are accessible to laypeople, some are not. That’s because Vivian Chan, Sparrho’s CEO and co-founder, originally designed the platform for herself. “I was doing my PhD at Cambridge University, and realized using search engines for science doesn’t work. There are all of these databases out there, but you have to know exactly what it is you’re looking for,” she says.

CONTINUE READING via A Google For Scientific Articles, For The Next Time You’re Locked In A Debate About Vaccines | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.